Do you miss… or rattle the chains?

A thank you and farewell to all

Not that this should be a shock to anybody, but the end of Rattling Chains has obviously happened.

However, I needed closure on this part of my life, as well as for the site, considering I still see e-mails asking about it.

announcementI had a time in my life where I was unemployed. This blog provided so many things for me. One, it allowed me to find one of the greatest games in the world. Though I don’t get to play as often as I’d like, I do still try and get out and throw plastic. I’m not an active PDGA member as I don’t plan on playing tournaments or anything, but I still support what they are trying to do.

Maybe, one day, I’ll get back into it. I do think I might subscribe to the magazine, though, as I miss that.

But for the time Rattling Chains existed, I fully believed in the cause. I wanted to bring a journalistic-style of blogging to the disc golf world. It’s something I still think can do well, if done right. As the site grew (and it did so nicely), we had a fun little staff who did some wonderful work.

Thing evolved, but when you try and grow and there’s nothing coming back, it gets tough. I didn’t play enough disc golf to have a full-fledged connection to it. The other main writers were doing so much with but just a thank you. Though, I can’t lie, I still hope to get out to the West Coast and play a round with each of the main players some day in the future.

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With spring here … it’s time to start chucking

In my neck of the woods, it was 66 degrees out yesterday.

After the winter and early spring we’ve had, my eyes popped when I saw that. Of course a lot of areas still have some snow and it’s really muddy out. But it’s a good sign.

Maybe I’ll finally get a chance to play some disc golf again. And start writing. That would be cool.

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When I started this site more than two years ago, I had no idea where it would go. But, I knew it was something I needed to do for a couple of reasons – mainly because there weren’t many disc golf blogs with decent stuff and also because, at the time, I was unemployed and needed to find something to help me through that time.

It worked.

Over the next two years, we had some ups and downs. We had some great writers with us, good stories and a solid following. But it never grew to certain levels and I think it wasn’t necessarily about the quality of the content, but what we did. I never intended to try and make money off the site, either, as I wanted to make sure we always kept independent.

That didn’t stop us from doing what we had hoped to do – deliver some cool stuff.

See, looking at statistics over time, the biggest hits usually came with reviews or shorter stories. The longer, more in-depth features, while liked by many, didn’t get as many hits. It makes sense though, as society grows, that kind of “journalistic style” isn’t always something people want to read. Disc golfers are players, for the most part. They want to know what can help their game.

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A tournament at the Chasm more than delivers on expectations

The Chasm.

The Chasm.

By Matt-Jackie Bertram – for Rattling Chains

We’ve all been to parks or hiking trails or fields and immediately had those disc golf lines appear before our eyes.

We’ve all stared down a line of trees and thought, “That would be a really fun fairway to play.” Maybe you’ve even been lucky enough to set up a few safari holes or played a round of pirate golf in those areas. But chances are you’ve never thrown a disc across raging rapids, or down 200 feet of sheer cliff side.

Unless, of course, you’ve played in the Steady Ed Safari, held at Ausable Chasm in the far north of New York State.

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Not an easy layout.

Sponsored by DGA, the Steady Ed Safari wrapped up its sophomore outing on September 21. More of an event than a tournament, Ausable Chasm provides a full weekend of disc golf, camping, and hiking tours through the chasm proper, if you choose to stay. The property also boasts a permanent 18-hole (soon to be 27) course, named Campgrounds, which is used for some casual glow golf on the night prior to the main event and also for one of the tournament rounds.

The other tournament round, however, is the main reason for attending.

The crew at Ausable Chasm builds a Frankenstein of an 18-hole safari course up and down and over the chasm itself. Some baskets involve a 10-minute hike down the cliffs to take your second shot. Others require a raft to ferry you across the rapids to reach your lie. And one hole makes use of a vacant boathouse that contains the basket at the end of a challenging par 5.

Does that sound like an interesting round of golf to you? It should.

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5.5 different reasons to practice putting in disc golf

Conventional wisdom says putting is a crucial facet of any successful golfer’s game — and conventional wisdom is correct.

No one who has ever spent a round crushing long, accurate drives only to score poorly because he or she couldn’t hit a putt (that would be everyone) would argue. Yet few players practice putting with a purposeful, regular routine.

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If you’re reading this, you are likely someone who has at least a moderate desire to shoot lower scores on the disc golf course. Therefore, if you’re not systematically working to improve your putting skills and consistency, the question is why?

One logical answer is that you’ve never heard a specific reason or reasons that resonated strongly enough with you personally. It’s one thing to agree with the logic in a general, vague sort of way, but quite another to be able to connect the dots with a straight line that leads directly to a result you value highly.

Therefore, the below 5.5 reasons to practice putting in disc golf are presented as a means of motivating more players to create and stick to a putting practice routine.

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January 20: What’s in Your Bag?

This edition of What’s in your bag comes from Josh Rogers, who calls Dacey Fields Disc Golf Course in Franklin, Mass., his home course.

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Rogers, of Bellingham, Mass., said he gets better each time he plays the par-62 course, a tightly wooded and low-option one. The tees are all natural as the course is still young.

As for his bag, he uses a Bass Pro Shops Extreme Qualifier 360 Angler backpack. It’s not fully converted, but it holds a lot of items with minimal impact on his shoulders.

The bag carries 14 discs. These include:

  • Latitude Test Material 2 Bolt (168 grams)
  • (4) Innova Beats in three plastics (randing from 162 in DX to 164 in champion and 168 in star)
The contents in the bag of Josh Rogers.

The contents in the bag of Josh Rogers.

  • Latitude 64 Trident (170)
  • (2) Latitude 64 Opto Rivers (172)
  • Vibram Obex (174)
  • Discraft Buzzz X (175)
  • Discraft Buzzz Z (177)
  • Latitude 64 Pure Eze Line (172)
  • Latitude 64 Zero Soft (172)

Also in the bag:

  • PDGA Rule Book/Competition Manual
  • 2013 inBounds Flight Guide
  • 2012 Marshall Street Flight Guide
  • Scorecards for the Pyramids Course at Marshall Street
  • Marshall Street Mini
  • Two Towels
  • One multi-knife
  • Two golf balls
  • One blue, one black pen
  • Permanent marker
  • Innova Pencil from my first tournament
  • Coin purse
  • Rain jacket
  • Umbrella

Want to submit your bag and contents? Here’s what we need: A couple of photos of your bag and discs. Put together a list of everything you carry in the bag — from food to discs to anything else. Then maybe give a paragraph or two about your bag and if there’s anything you do between casual and tournament rounds etc. Finally, don’t forget your name, location and home course! Cell phone photos are fine, but please try and make it as high quality as possible. Grainy shots might not be able to be used. E-mail all of these things to pj@rattlingchains.com with the subject “What’s in my bag.”